Musings on the Craft of Writing

Posts tagged “Self-publishing

►Eavesdropping on a Pubbing Argument

The discussions I’m linking to are long (so long that I printed them off), but for all of us interested in the publishing industry (especially we who are torn about whether we should self-pub or go to the traditional houses), this is well worth our time.

I’ll break it its three main chronological parts:

1) Steve Zacharius (owner of (more…)

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►Your Vault is Your Hope

As I’ve said before, being a novel-writer is a lot like pushing Sisyphus’ stone.  We work for months or years on each draft, spend serious cash seeking help to perfect it, and then repeat that process until we believe that manuscript is perfect.  Most do this for the hope of becoming paid, full-time authors.

But intermittently, we writers are smacked with the reality that we’ve been digging in the mines for years… for nothing.  Playing the odds, the vast majority of us will either make a pittance (more…)


[Reblog]- Five Mistakes Killing Self-Published Authors

I have only posted about Self-pubbing once, wherein I talk about the downside to the “Revolution.”  This post by Kristen Lamb is well-considered and well-written.  I encourage all Indie-pubbers out here to read it.

~Daniel


►Self-publishing, or “Revolutions do smell bad”

Over the past couple of years the talk of the “Self-publishing revolution” has spread into all corners of the Interwebs.  Writers are Eugène_Delacroix_-_La_liberté_guidant_le_peuplecelebrating that we are now no longer at the mercy of literary agents or publishing houses (who sometimes seem to make their publishing choices by shaking a Magic 8 Ball).  We also know that nepotism, cronyism and all kinds of other unfair –isms are pushing people up into the “legitimately” published sphere.  The traditional publishing houses used to be indispensable, unless you happened to have a spare $100K lying around to publish and market your book.  Even in the Internet’s early days, the “Vanity publishers” realized that they could buy book-pressers and print for desperate authors.  And now the internet is so powerful that the traditional marketing they used is stuck in the back seat (if not the trunk).  The monopoly is broken.

But here comes the other side…  (more…)