Musings on the Craft of Writing

Posts tagged “Book

►Wine and Roses

Good 1st Drafts are like good 1st Dates: Brimming with excitement, blinding to imperfections.

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►Typing ≠ Writing

typists type

So true.

It feels so good to “actually be ‘writing’” the story.  Although it may sound strange, a danger is hiding here, for the emotional highs we get from “finishing” sections/chapters/books can sometimes hinder the creative process.  We have to be careful to consistently step back, get to the window and stare.

We should repeat this practice throughout the entirety of our projects.  Milling over our stories before, during and after the keyboarding is vital to writing a great novel. Keep musing, charting, planning,  critiquing and, of course, typing.  Novel writing is the sum of those parts.

~Daniel


►Story Structure or, “What I learned from the Three Little Pigs”

When we love a story, when a book stays with us for days (or decades) we know that it “works.”  What we mean by that is that the story fulfilled specific desires (based on the genre/tone of that novel).  But how does one story work and another fail?

Of course there’s always some subjectivity on the matter, but overall we do seem to share a “communal objectivity” about a tale either soaring or flopping. Tastes vary, but we still recognize the difference (more…)


►Deer in the Spotlight

Graeme Brown is a Fantasy author in Canada, and he asked about my life as a writer.  If your boredom has reached Mount Everest proportions, go check it out HERE.

Thanks,

~Daniel


►My Novel-Writing Methodology: The Actual Writing

After I have done all that I listed here I finally get to sit down at the keyboard and start typing it.

1)      I am sure to have a “sacred space” for my writing without distractions.  I write in my basement where there is (by design) no Network connection.  (I even went out a few years ago and bought a used laptop with a broken wireless adapter for this purpose.)  I also set the mood for my writing.

2)      I lay out my scene list from my pre-drafting work and start typing.  I have a master folder on each computer wherein I put a folder for that day’s work.  I make a different Word doc for each chapter.    (more…)


►Aut Disce Aut Discede

My experience with authors is that story-telling has been part of their lives for as far back as they can recall.  It’s true of me as well.  Authors I have spoken with express the same joy (and need) of writing.  But why are most novels so humdrum?  How is it that we (the authors) can be so exuberant about our stories and yet leave so many who read our stories so lukewarm?   The primary problem, I think, is that we don’t take the writing craft seriously.

When I began my first novel I had a premise which I (and others) fell in love with.  And so I sat down and started writing it.  I was educated, had been writing for school for years, was well-read, etc..  But between the completion of Draft 1 and Draft 2, I did the best thing possible for my writing—I schooled myself.

(more…)


►Self-publishing, or “Revolutions do smell bad”

Over the past couple of years the talk of the “Self-publishing revolution” has spread into all corners of the Interwebs.  Writers are Eugène_Delacroix_-_La_liberté_guidant_le_peuplecelebrating that we are now no longer at the mercy of literary agents or publishing houses (who sometimes seem to make their publishing choices by shaking a Magic 8 Ball).  We also know that nepotism, cronyism and all kinds of other unfair –isms are pushing people up into the “legitimately” published sphere.  The traditional publishing houses used to be indispensable, unless you happened to have a spare $100K lying around to publish and market your book.  Even in the Internet’s early days, the “Vanity publishers” realized that they could buy book-pressers and print for desperate authors.  And now the internet is so powerful that the traditional marketing they used is stuck in the back seat (if not the trunk).  The monopoly is broken.

But here comes the other side…  (more…)